Genealogy of Emma Campbell Hudson


Most of the data in my on-line pedigree was just borrowed from other on-line pedigrees, but some of it, such as information on Ameret Case, comes from old family records or genealogies which are not available, either on-line or in libraries. Here is some more information related to Ameret Case, and her granddaughter, Emma Rosella Campbell Hudson.

This information mostly comes from Genealogy Of Emma Rosella Campbell Hudson prepared in 1963 by Earl Rosenberg, a brother-in-law of my great-grandmother Lois Hudson Allen. His sources are not indicated clearly, but include Connecticut Men of the Revolution. Much of the information probably was obtained via old family records preserved by Ameret Case.

I [James D. Allen] have reworded some of Rosenberg's work and added a little material about Lois Hudson and ancient connections.

Shown to the right is a photograph of Emma Campbell Hudson and her husband. I stole it from an excellent on-line biography of T. J. Hudson.

I've added more information about TJH, especially his appearance in censuses, at this page.

The Brown Line

Generation 0: The Other Peter Brown of the early Plymouth colony

Peter Brown was born 1632 in Plymouth, Massachusetts (same say England), and died March 9, 1692 in Windsor, Connecticut. He married Mary Gillette in 1658.

Rosenberg shows Peter Brown's father as the Pilgrim founder Peter Brown who signed the Mayflower Compact. I guess ``descent from the Mayflower'' is one of the snobbish goals of genealogy and for many years we thought we had it, but I have since learned that this connection is not accepted by the experts. The parents of both Peter Browns are regarded as unknown; about the only thing experts agree on is that the one Peter was not the other's father.

The proof that Peter Brown (1632 - 1692) and his sister Isabel were not children of Mayflower Peter seems to be based on a list of children the latter provided (in his will?). The list includes no Peter or Isabel. But Peter and Isabel were born in the last year of Mayflower Peter's life, or possibly even after his death, so maybe the experts are wrong after all.

Peter and Mary had a son John.

Generation 1: John Brown

John Brown was born January 8, 1668 in Windsor, Connecticut and died in 1728. He married Elizabeth Loomis (1671 - 1723) in 1692.

John and Elizabeth had a son John.

Generation 2: John Brown II

John Brown II was born 1700 in Windsor, Connecticut and died 1790 in the same city. He married Mary Eggleston.

Mary Eggleston was the great granddaughter of the immigrant Bygod Eggleston; this was the very first new connection I found when I started exploring Internet genealogies. I probably focussed there because of the rarity of the surname Eggleston but the given name Bygod is even rarer: in all my searches I have never come across any other person with this as a given name (although it is an important surname in English nobility).

Bygod Eggleston is shown, in many genealogies, as the great grandson of Dorothy Bigod, a descendant of King Edward III. It was her fabulous pedigree that got me started into medieval genealogy, but I have since learned that there is no evidence she was related to Bygod Eggleston at all, although both were from the same village in Yorkshire. Instead the relationship seems to be a pure conjecture based on Bygod's unusual name. A plausible conjecture perhaps, but with no real evidence.

On the other side, Mary Eggleston's grandmother was Isabel Brown, supposedly sister of the afore-mentioned Peter Brown (1632 - 1692).

John and Mary had a son John.

Generation 3: Captain John Brown

Captain John Brown was born November 4, 1728 in Windsor, Connecticut and married Hannah Owen (1740 - 1831) in 1758. He was chosen Captain of the West Simsbury (later named Canton) ``train band'' at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War and joined the forces of the Continental Army.

A marble monument in the graveyard at Canton Centre contains the following inscription: ``In memory of Captain John Brown, who died in the Revolutionary Army at New York, Sept. 3, 1776. He was of the fourth generation in regular descent from Peter Brown, one of the Pilgrim Fathers, who landed from the Mayflower at Plymouth, Mass. Dec 20, 1620.'' The mistaken Mayflower connection is thus quite old (assuming it is a mistake).

Generation 4: The Children of Captain John Brown and Hannah Owen

4. Hannah (b. 1758  d. 1825) m. (as 2nd wife) Solomon Humphrey.
4. Azubah (b. 1760  d. 1812) m. Michael Barber.
4. Esther (b. 1762  d. 1838) m. Timothy Case (shown below under ``Case Line'').
4. Margery (b. 1764  d. 1820) m. 1st (as 2nd wife) David Giddings, 2nd Prince Taylor (also as 2nd wife).
4. Lucinda (b. 1765  d. 1814) m. (as 2nd wife) Russell Borden.
4. John (b. 1767  d. 1849) m. 1st Millicent Gaylord, 2nd Abby Case (widow).
4. Frederick (b. 1769  d. 1848) m. 1st Catherine Case, 2nd Chloe S. Pettibone.
4. Owen (b. 1771  d. 1856) m. 1st Ruth Mills, 2nd Sarah Root, 3rd Abi Hinsdale.
4. Thede (b. 1773  d. 1846) m. (as 2nd wife) William Merrills.
4. Roxy (b. 1775  d. 1855) m. Alexander Humphrey.
4. Abiel (b. 1776  d. 1858) m. Anna Lord.

Rosenberg notes ``the average age of this family was about seventy years.''

Esther Brown and Timothy Case were the parents of Ameret Case.

Esther's brother Owen and Ruth Mills were the parents of John Brown ``of Osawatomie'' who is therefore Ameret Case's first cousin (and my own first cousin six times removed). This John Brown was born May 9, 1800 in Torrington, Connecticut and achieved fame in 1856 by battling pro-slavery ruffians in ``Bloody'' Kansas. On October 16, 1859 with his sons and other men he seized the U. S. Armory at Harper's Ferry, Virginia. He was hanged on December 2, 1859 in Charleston, Virginia, the only man ever executed for treason against an American state. This famous abolitionist is celebrated in the song ``John Brown's body lies a-molderin' in the grave, but his truth goes marching on.'' Three years after John Brown's martyrdom, America's slaves were emancipated by Abraham Lincoln.

(John Brown of Osawatomie's mother Ruth Mills was Owen Brown's 2nd cousin.)

The Case Line

Generation 1: John Case

John Case, apparently born 1616 in Aylesham, England, fled from England with his father and two brothers in the time of King Charles and Oliver Cromwell. Later they joined the company of Pilgrims bound for America. His father died at sea; brother Thomas never married; so the early American Cases are descended from John or his brother William.

John Case settled first in Windsor, Conn. and moved in 1667 to Massacoe (now Simsbury) Conn. He was appointed constable for Massacoe on October 14, 1669 and was the first to hold that office. He married Sarah Spencer of Hartford Conn. about 1657.

Sarah died Nov. 3, 1691 at the age of 55. John then married Elizabeth Moore Loomis, daughter of John Moore and widow of Nathaniel Loomis of Windsor Conn. John died Feb. 21, 1704 at Simsbury, Conn. Elizabeth died twice-widowed July 23, 1728 also in Simsbury.

Sarah Spencer is 9th cousin eight times removed of Lady Diana, Princess of Wales. As shown on my website, both these ladies are supposedly agnatic descendants of the first Lord Despencer and the first Earl of Shrewsbury, but I have since learned that this connection is now considered to be some ancient genealogist's fraud.

Sarah's paternal grandmother was Alice Whitbred. Alice is shown, in some genealogies, as great granddaughter of Sir Humphrey Radcliffe (1509?-1566), who had a very royal pedigree. But, again, this connection is based on guesswork which is not condoned by experts.

My only accredited royal connection :--

Sarah's maternal grandmother was Elizabeth Collamore. Here, finally, is a royal descendant accepted by experts! Unfortunately, it's a very weak, very distant royal connection. From Elizabeth Collamore it's five generations further back just to get a ``Lord'' and then eight more generations just to get to an ``Earl,'' e.g. Reynold de Mohun (1184-1213) Earl of Somerset. From there, many ancient pedigrees are controversial, but a few lines that stretch back to Kings of the tenth century or earlier are regarded as proven. Of these the shortest is nine further generations from the aforementioned Earl back to Adalbert II d'Ivrea (936?-971) King of Italy, and 4-great grandson of Charlemagne.

As a claim of royal blood, my 34-generation descent, via Sarah Spencer, from King Adalbert II is almost ludicrously dilute. But perversely I think it's fabulous, precisely because such a long yet proven chain exists to ancient Kings.

Generation 2: The Children of John Case and Sarah Spencer

2. Elizabeth (b. 1658?  d. 1718) m. 1st Joseph Lewis, 2nd John Fuller (or Tuller).
2. Mary (b. June 22, 1660  d. 1725) m. 1st William Alderman, 2nd J. S. Hillier.
2. John (b. Nov. 5, 1662  d. 1773) m. 1st Mary Olcott, 2nd Sarah Holcomb.
2. William (b. June 5, 1665  d. ?) m. Elizabeth Holcomb.
2. Samuel (b. June 1, 1667  d. 1725) m. 1st Mary Westover, 2nd Elizabeth Owen Thrall.
2. Richard (Captain) (b. August 27, 1669 or '67  d. 1746) m. Amy Reed.
2. Bartholomew (b. Oct. 1670  d. 1725) m. Mary Humphrey.
2. Joseph (b. April 6, 1674  d. Aug. 11, 1748) m. Anna Ens (or Eno).
2. Sarah (b. August 14, 1676  d. 1701) m. Joseph Phelps, Jr. of Windsor, Conn.
2. Abigail (b. May 4, 1682  d. ?) m. John Westover, Jr.

Generation 3: The Children of Capt. Richard Case and Amy Reed

The only grandchild of John Case recorded in the Rosenberg work is Sgt. Richard Case, a child of Captain Richard Case and Amy Reed. I copied the other children of Case-Reed from the Thomas Holcombe genealogy site, www.holcombegenealogy.com
3. Amy (b. 1703  d. 1792)
3. Timothy (b. 1708  d. 1754)
3. Richard (Sergeant) (b. 1710  d. 1769) m. Mercy Holcomb (1712 - 1780).
3. Margaret (b. 1714?  d. 1750)
3. Edward (b. 1716  d. 1746)
3. Lydia (b. 1718  d. 1740+)
3. Mary (b. 1722?  d. 1742+)

Sergeant Richard Case and Mercy Holcomb moved to West Simsbury, Conn. in 1757. They were the first settlers in that part of town. (Mercy is descended from the afore-mentioned Isabel Brown, alleged daughter of the Mayflower Peter Brown.)

Mercy Holcomb was the great granddaughter of the immigrant Thomas Holcombe, a well-known genealogical ``gateway'' to royal blood. Unfortunately it turns out, again, that experts are quite skeptical of attempts to identify the parents of this immigrant.

Generation 4: The Children of Sergeant Richard Case and Mercy Holcomb

4. Richard (b. 1734  d. 1805) m. Ruth Case.
4. Joab (b. 1735  d. 1758).
4. Sylvanus (b. 1737  d. 1817) m. 1st Caroline Humphrey, 2nd Hepzibah Humphrey.
4. Simeon (b. 1739  d. 1822 or '23) m. Mary Case.
4. Elizabeth (b. 1741  d. 1804) m. Athildred Curtis.
4. Uriah (b. 1743  d. 1826) m. 1st Susannah Lawrence, 2nd Eunice Dill (or Hill).
4. Edward (b. 1748  d. 1822?) m. Zernah Lawrence.
4. Phineas (b. 1750  d. 1798) m. Sarah Fuller.
4. Mercy (b. 1750 or '52  d. 1818) m. Abram Moses.
4. Naoma (b. 1755  d. 1822) m. David Pettibone.
4. Timothy (b. 1759  d. 1850) m. Esther Brown (shown above under ``Brown Line'').

Timothy Case and Esther Brown were married in 1781 at Simsbury, where they resided until 1797. Timothy taught school every alternate year in Simsbury and then in Hartford. From 1797 until 1822 they lived in Otis, Massachusetts. From 1822 on they lived in Andover, Ashtabula County, Ohio.

Timothy Case was about 6 feet, 6 inches in height. When he was 92 years old, he was visited by his Pennsylvania grandchildren who reported that he wore his hair braided in a queue, and dressed in old colonial fashion, with long silk stockings and silver knee buckles. He was very proud that he could read at that time without the aid of glasses, second sight having come to him.

Generation 5: The Children of Timothy Case and Esther Brown

5. Infant (b. 1782).
5. Infant (b. 1783).
5. Esther (b. 1784  d. 1846) m. Daniel Strickland.
5. Flora (b. 1786  d. ?) m. Worthy Pratt.
5. Timothy (b. 1788  d. 1816) m. Roeny Brewster.
5. Alcy (b. 1789  d. ?) m. Amos Miner.
5. Ameret (b. May 29, 1791  d. January 14, 1888) m. in 1811 to Ira Nichols (b. July 13, 1787  d. January 16, 1856).
5. Hannah (b. 1793  d. 1869) m. Oliver Clark.
5. Hiram (b. 1795  d. 1815).
5. Salmon (b. 1797  d. 1840) m. Mary Cadwell.
5. Norman (b. 1799  d. 1822).
5. Selah (b. 1801  d. 1871) m. Anna DeWolf.
5. Orrin (b. 1803  d. 1803).
5. Orrin Brown (b. 1804  d. 1880) m. 1st Delia Ann Creesey, 2nd Sarah Stillman, widow of Erastus Stillman.

Generation 6: The Children of Ira Nichols and Ameret Case

6. Elsa (Elsie) Roena (b. August 15, 1812  d. August 22, 1890) m. 1834 Charles Stuart Biggers (1802 - 1880).
(Two granddaughters of this Biggers-Nichols union, with maiden surnames of McAdams, are accredited Daughters of the American Revolution based on the descent from Captain John Brown shown here.)
6. Orrin Case (b. Feb. 24, 1814  d. Oct. 12, 1873) m. 1837 Lydia Frisbee.(1817-1889)
(A granddaughter of this Nichols-Frisbee union is an accredited Daughter of the American Revolution based on the descent from Captain John Brown shown here.)
6. Lucinda Maria (b. August 4, 1816  d. April 12, 1844) m. William Hodges.
6. Eliza Ann (b. January 1, 1818  d. December 12, 1890) m. Alonzo Herrick.
6. Esther (b. October 12, 1820  d. August 18, 1822).
6. Henry (b. March 11, 1822  d. April 12, 1844).
6. Norman (b. July 2, 1824).
6. Norton (b. July 2, 1824  d. January 7, 1854).
6. Hannah Ellen (b. April 11, 1826  d. April 9, 1911) m. Perry Durham.
6. Esther Elizabeth (b. January 30, 1829 Cambridge, PA. d. March 21, 1901 San Diego, CA) m. on March 15, 1847 in Cambridge, PA to Francis Isherwood Campbell.
6. Mary (b. September 10, 1830  d. ?) m. James Anderson.
6. James Robinson (b. December 26, 1833  d. February 10, 1835).

Francis Isherwood Cambell's parents were William Campbell (b. Feb. 25, 1790  d. Sept. 17, 1825) and Hannah Isherwood (b. Feb. 5, 1794 d. June 23, 1878) who were married at Edinboro, PA on December 5, 1812.

Rosenberg didn't pursue Francis Campbell's ancestry further, but I was able to deduce his mother's parents and found on-line an interesting pedigree for his father.

Generation 7: T. J. Hudson and Emma Campbell

Francis I. Campbell and Esther E. Nichols moved to Topeka, Kansas sometime in 1858. They had four children (Effie, Emma Rosella, Stella Ameret, and Willie) but only Emma Rosella (b. October 20, 1851 Edinboro, PA; d. December 17, 1930, Fredonia, Kansas) survived to adulthood.

7. Emma Rosella m. 1870 Thomas Jefferson Hudson (1839 - 1923).
(Emma and three of her daughters are accredited Daughters of the American Revolution based on the descent from Captain John Brown shown here.)

Emma Rosella Campbell graduated from Lincoln College (now Washburn college); she was the first woman to enroll at the institution and the first woman to graduate. On October 5, 1870, as a clerk at the State House in Topeka, Kansas, she married the Legislator from Wilson County, Thomas Jefferson Hudson (b. October 30, 1839, Boone County, Indiana d. January 4, 1923 Wichita Kansas).

Although all his biographies mention Hudson's place and date of birth, none names his parents. From the 1850 census (borrowed from the images at Ancestry.com), we find 11-year old ``Jefferson Hudson' and know the adults he was then living with:
 

(Three household members were shown on the next page, so not in this image.)

(I have prepared the following summary from Rosenberg's record, the Directory of the United States Congress, and T. J. Hudson's obituary in a Kansas newspaper.)

T. J. Hudson was a schoolteacher in Indiana, Missouri and Kansas, before receiving a law degree from the Cincinatti Law School, first in his class of sixty. (William Howard Taft was also a student there at the time.) During his early manhood he made two trips about which he often told stories in later years: a trip to Virginia City, Nevada and a trip across the Great Plains by covered wagon, fighting Indians, driving oxen and swimming the Platte River.

He finally settled in Wilson County, Kansas in 1869, with his son Merlin; his first wife, Mattie Patterson, having died with infant after her second childbirth. He taught the first school in Wilson County, and also organized the first Sunday school there: it was non-sectarian. In 1870 he was elected to the State Legislature, the first Representative from Wilson County. It was in Topeka where he met Emma Campbell, his second wife.

Hudson was a founder of the Wilson Co. Bar Association; he was the first Mayor of Fredonia, serving four terms, and also served three terms as County Attorney. He was a founding member and treasurer of the Fredonia School Board, and attracted considerable notice when he was able to sell 6% school bonds at par. He was one of the organizers of the Wilson County Bank. As a result of his intervention the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway was rerouted to pass through Fredonia, Kansas.

In 1892, Thomas J. Hudson, a Democrat, was elected to the United States Congress as a Populist from the strongest Republican district in Kansas. He gained notice with his successful defense of ``Coxey's Army,'' after their famous march on Washington, pleading that ``poverty is not a crime.'' In 1894, he was unanimously renominated for Congress, but declined to run.

When Rosenberg produced his Genealogy in 1963, he listed nine children of T. J. Hudson and Emma Campbell, 12 grandchildren, 24 great-grandchildren, and 18 great-great grandchildren. Since then, my children, nieces and nephew account for 7 great-great-great grandchildren. Doubtless there are others.

To preserve the privacy of living individuals I will list just one further generation:

Generation 8: The Children of T. J. Hudson and Emma Campbell

8. Stella (b. Sept. 5, 1871 Fredonia  d. July 6, 1872 Fredonia).
8. Lois (b. Sept. 28, 1873 Fredonia  d. July 30, 1948 Seward, Alaska) m. Sept. 4, 1895 in Fredonia to Guy Wiley Allen (Dec. 8, 1872 - Jan. 18, 1908).
8. Andrew (b. Jan. 30, 1876 Fredonia  d. April 24, 1957 Washington, D.C.) m. Mabel Selby Henry.
8. Elizabeth (b. Aug. 5, 1877 Fredonia  d. Sept. 29, 1954 San Diego, CA).
8. Walter Soule (b. Dec. 13, 1879 Fredonia  d. Feb. 5, 1887 Fredonia).
8. Thomas Jefferson II (b. Oct. 5, 1883 Fredonia  d. Feb. 26, 1955 Corpus Christi, TX) m. Georgia Leah Boggess.
8. Emma Castella (b. Nov. 10, 1886 Fredonia d. Feb. 27, 1887 Colorado Springs, Colo).
8. Blanche (b. April 27, 1888 Fredonia) m. Earl Rosenberg (the original preparer of most of this information).
8. Marjorie Ameret (b. March 17, 1897 Lawrence, KS) m. Howard Milton Temple.

Lois Hudson Allen

My great grandmother Lois Hudson Allen moved to Colorado and raised four sons after the untimely death of her husband (who was Chief Cashier of the Wilson County Bank). Like her father, she was active in politics and a life-long Democrat. She was turned down because she was a woman when she first applied for a job as a newspaper reporter, but showed up for work everyday anyway and did a reporter's job until she was officially hired. Eventually she became the publisher of at least three newspapers. (Female editors were uncommon in those days. When I examined the 1920 census of Fremont County, Colorado I encountered a word I'd never seen before: Lois H. Allen's occupation was shown as ``Editress.'')

When Lois Hudson was told she had inoperable breast cancer she moved from Colorado to Skagway, Alaska in order not to be a burden to her sons. She lived for several more years, founded newspapers, wrote for magazines and published a book, Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. That book is still well-known to this day and many readers are surprised when they learn its author, L. H. Allen, was a woman.

Lois was a pragmatic woman. Her obituary and biography both give her age as five years younger than Rosenberg's records show. The Rosenberg data is surely correct: for one thing, T. J. Hudson's obituary lists his living children in order of age. I think Lois threw five years overboard on the voyage to Alaska to facilitate her acceptance as a newly arriving businesswoman.

Lois H. Allen once divulged the secret of her newspapers' success:

``Give the people controversy. Have the courage to take sides on a question. Lots of people may then hate you but they always read what you have to say.''

Here are excerpts from other biographies, old and recent, of Lois H. Allen:

Lois Allen, formerly of the Manitou Springs Journal, and the Colorado Springs Telegraph, bought the Fremont County Leader in the summer of 1916 from Dodge's Leader Publishing Company. Recently widowed, she arrived with five young sons. According to Sterling, she made the paper "democratic and forthwith got into a fight with Thomas J. Tynan, warden of the prison, who didn't want any competition in his bailiwick," said J. Leo Sterling. Allen and Tynan fought it out in all the meetings from the caucus to the state convention. As a result, if there was prison news, Tynan gave it to the Daily Record, which "was not his backer in any sense," but got the scoop. Allen began referring to her competition as the ``Convict Record.'' Mrs. Allen killed the Leader in the late spring of 1921 and, sounding a little like a latter-day Henry Ripley, wrote:

This is the last issue of the Leader. We intended to make it a better issue than usual but the story of the flood is paramount news of the week and the merchants are necessarily conservative as to advertising, since there is no freight or truck service.

The Record has purchased the Leader's subscription list and will run out all unexpired subscriptions.

We thank the business men of Canon City for the splendid patronage they have given us and we are grateful for the friends we have made and sorry that we have made some enemies.

Inter-Mountain Press (IMP) commented:
[We] venture the positive assertion that Mrs. Allen's friends in Canon City outnumber her enemies a thousand to one....She is an honest, courageous newspaper publisher, which is more than can be said for a great many of her fellow publishers of the so-called sterner sex. She possessed an unusual degree of ability, a world of persistence and a degree of graciousness and charm which long ago won for her the warm friendship of the members of the Editorial association. [She was the immediate past president of the association.] Inter-Mountain Press can but wish her the best of luck in the work she is undertaking and assure her that that wish comes from the heart and not from the mechanical "quertyuiop" of a typewriter pounded thoughtlessly by one in search of filler.
IMP, on another page of the June 1921 issue, give further information on the Mrs. Allen's decision:

[She] voluntarily killed the Fremont County Leader, and will move such of the equipment as is suitable to a printing office, to Pueblo where, with her sons, she will operate a job office. In explanation of her action in closing up the business she writes that her sons prefer the job printing department and are not particularly interested in newspaper work, and as she hopes to establish them in a paying business she determined to move to Pueblo where there is a greater field for commercial printing. "When we become firmly established," she says, "the day may come when I can stay at home and cook and knit--I always was intended to be a hausfrau."

Mrs. Allen didn't get to knit much. She was back in the newspaper business in 1922 with the Pueblo County Democrat .

In the early 1930s she moved to Moose Pass, Alaska, where she founded the Moose Pass Miner, and wrote magazine articles. Mrs. Allen died there on July 30, 1948. Her two sons were living in Denver.

Further Connections

Many other Americans claim descent from John Case and Sarah Spencer, but, despite the many many on-line genealogies, I have found very few that relate to the later generations shown here. I have come across a single family tree showing descent from Emma Rosella Campbell's aunt, Eliza Ann, and a single family tree showing a cousin relationship to Emma's daughter-in-law Georgia Boggess. In each case I was able to provide a fellow genealogist with a little more information.

The fellow genealogist supplied me with a pedigree of Emma's grandfather William Campbell; enough to connect with a very distant cousin who had identified Emma's 4th great grandfather John Campbell. John Campbell was imprisoned for his religious beliefs and eventually banished to America on the Henry and Francis which sailed in 1685.

Another on-line genealogy shows descent from a cousin of Lois Hudson's husband Guy Allen, but a 120-year old text book was needed to make that connection!

Finding the Hudsons

``Thomas Hudson'', and ``T. J. Hudson'' are common names, almost worthless for general searches on the Internet. I tried two other combinations: ``Thomas Jefferson Hudson'' and ``Thomas J. Hudson AND (Fredonia OR Boone Indiana)'' but still got nowhere. I shouldn't have given up: ``T J Hudson AND Fredonia'' would have linked me to a useful page!

After Diane Olthius provided me with the news that T J Hudson had a brother Isaac, searching for `Isaac Hudson AND Kansas' or some such I discovered that Isaac Hudson was also a Mayor of Fredonia, and active in some of his brother's ventures. This was in an old contemporary sketch of Kansas, transcribed on-line by the University of Kansas. The book provided no particularly useful details about the Hudsons, but also contained a biography of James Wiley, prominent citizen of the Fredonia area 11 years older than T. J. Hudson. (T. J. Hudson did not have a biography, mentioned just in the synopses of Fredonia administration and banking.) That James Wiley had his children listed, including one ``Mrs. Annetta J. Allen.''

At the time I knew little about that branch of my family, but I knew one thing: T. J. Hudson's daughter Lois married the son of Annetta Allen nee Wiley! I also knew my grandfather's `Grandma Annie' had a brother Doctor Frank. Sure enough, another child shown for James Wiley was ``Dr. F. M. Wiley.''

The parentage of Thomas J. Hudson is very hard to locate. (This seems rather odd.) I've located Thomas in three censuses (1850, 1860, 1920). In 1850 he is shown (under just the name Jefferson) living with Andrew Hudson (b. NC) and Rachael Gipson (b. KY). Some search based on `Hudson AND Gipson AND Boone Co.' got me in touch with a possible Gipson cousin. I look for a Andrew Hudson census entry in 1840 Boone County but it doesn't seem to exist. Anyway, here's T. J. Hudson's pedigree. This seemed interesting enough to merit its own little webpage.

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